Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Lucky number 7!

Within any type of a message the first thing that is a given is that there is an entity at each end. One to send the information, and one to receive the information in a meaningful way. I know it sounds basic but you would be surprised out how many people get this wrong. If a message is sent but either sender or receiver is not there to take up his end of the communication process, no dice, no good, transmission unsuccessful.
Now if we break down and really begin to think about the idea "What is information?", We run into a strange way of thinking. At first the idea of just what is information closely constitutes a very slippery type of question, in that human beings tend to get the idea of communication and meaning from symbols by inferring both complexity and specificity.
For instance, if one were to go and wander out into the desert and come upon a stone with what appeared to be chiseled writing in an unkown language, even though we could not at that time, and perhaps never could, decifer the language on the stone we would still be able to see clearly that something put the marks in the stone, and that is was not random. One would infer (correctly) that design was present, because the strokes from a chisel did not appear to be ordered, and one would infer information because their were too many data points ( in this case the various symbols that we might refer to as letters.) to be able to pass the ordering off as a symptom of a repeated natural phenomenon.
So in the interest of keeping it nice and short, lets dive into a somewhat lengthy preamble to a message that, though no-one understands in its minutiae, we can certainly infer design from...

"Behold, there come seven years of great plenty throughout all the land of Egypt:"
(Genesis 41:29 KJV)

"And there shall arise after them seven years of famine; and all the plenty shall be forgotten in the land of Egypt; and the famine shall consume the land;"
(Genesis 41:30 KJV)

"And thou shalt number seven sabbaths of years unto thee, seven times seven years; and the space of the seven sabbaths of years shall be unto thee forty and nine years."
(Leviticus 25:8 KJV)

"And they that dwell in the cities of Israel shall go forth, and shall set on fire and burn the weapons, both the shields and the bucklers, the bows and the arrows, and the handstaves, and the spears, and they shall burn them with fire seven years:"
(Ezekiel 39:9 KJV)

"Seventy weeks are determined upon thy people and upon thy holy city, to finish the transgression, and to make an end of sins, and to make reconciliation for iniquity, and to bring in everlasting righteousness, and to seal up the vision and prophecy, and to anoint the most Holy."
(Daniel 9:24 KJV)

Going to the other end of the bible, to the book of Revelation, sevens are all over the place. We mentioned some of them earlier. There are SEVEN churches, SEVEN Spirits, SEVEN stars, SEVEN seals, SEVEN trumpets, SEVEN vials, SEVEN personages, SEVEN dooms, and SEVEN new things. some commentators have said that SEVEN symbolizes Spiritual Perfection. Noah took the clean beasts into the ark by SEVENS, and on and on and on. There are also some hidden sevens.

Heres a simple one. Of the books of the New Testament, we have a total of 9 church epistles.
They are Romans, 1st Corinthians and 2nd Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, Phillipians, 1st Thessalonians and 2nd Thessalonians.

Now theres a phrase at the end of the Colossian letter that seems to tie them together. The verse reads "When this letter has been read among you, have it read also in the church of the Laodiceans. And be sure to read the one from Laodicea"

so now there seems to be a connection between the book of Colossians and the letter to the church in Laodicea.

So then, is there a way to connect the rest of the letters? Well I'll leave it to the reader to come up with all of that, but if you take the letters of 1st and 2nd Corinthians as one letter and the letters 1st and 2nd Thessalonians as one...How many letters to churches do you have?


This seems to point to the fact that the authors somehow knew what they were doing and coordinated what they wrote about over a period of 6-7 thousand years. Although at this point the complexity of information part of our question posed above is still in doubt, it would be logical to at least assume that their was some type of message being sent, although we cant say that concretely. At this point its just speculation, an interesting conundrum that needs investigation.

What we really need is more data.

It gets more interesting, there is actually at least one way we can interpret all of this data about the number 7, which is using it as a trial node to find other interesting data across other related but differently encoded symbol systems to see, for lack of a better word, "whats up".

Now Hebrew is a language that has no vowels, the vowel markings were added later. Since many words are only three letters long it makes it relatively easy to find hidden words using a skip code. There would be far more word matches in an ancient Hebrew text than in an English text with the same number of pages, and to that end, I am a bit skeptical of some of the Equidistant Letter Skips in the Old Testament.

However, what most skeptics of Bible codes seem to miss about the particular code we are about to look at is that we are taking a data point that seems to be statisically significant in a book that was written several thousand years later, a book that is seen as both predicting the future and tying together a myriad of holy books that were repeatedly prophectically accurate, in many places recording the very words of God, Believed to be penned by 40 emanuencies with God working through them in a sort of mystical way. Also, one was written in Greek, and one was written in Hebrew. Two completely different symbol systems used to send a message.
We are using the results of a statisically significant number in Revelation to look for statisically significant words encoded in Genesis.

Well, having laid the groundwork for all of this, lets take a look at Genesis.

In the Hebrew of Genesis, if you take the first "T", then count 49 letters, the next letter (the 50th) is "O"; the next 50th is "R"; and then the next 50th is "H". In other words, after the first "T", in 50 letter increments, we find the letters spelling Torah (TORaH). (See Figure 1.)

In the Book of Exodus, we also encounter a similar result. What a coincidence!

It doesn't seem to work with the third Book of Moses, Leviticus. But stay with me here.

In the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers, we discover this 49-letter interval works with HROT," that is, TORH backwards. (See Figure 2.) A similar 49-letter interval also appears in the fifth book of the Torah, the Book of Deuteronomy.

However, in the middle book, the Book of Leviticus, it doesn't seem to work either way. But it does work for YHWH, the sacred name of God ("Yahweh or Jehovah," translated "Lord" in the King James Version), if you count in seven letter increments. (See Figure 3.)

Here is the overview:

Genesis Exodus Leviticus Numbers Deuteronomy
---> ---> <--- <---

It appears that by using the number 49 (which is 7 times 7) the Torah (TORH) always points toward the Name of God.

So this brings us to my favorite "letter to the editor" ever.

Ivan Panin was born in Russia on December 12, 1855. As a young man he was an active nihilist and participated in plots against the Czar and his government. He was a mathematical genius who died a Harvard scholar and a citizen of the United States in 1942.

Panin was known as a firm agnostic - so well known that when he discarded his agnosticism and accepted the Christian faith, the newspapers carried headlines telling of his conversion.

It was in 1890 that Panin made the discovery of the mathematical structure underlining the vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. He was casually reading the first verse of the gospel of John in the Greek: "In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with the God and the Word was God...".

Panin was curious as to why the Greek word for "the"' preceded the word "God"' in one case and not the other. In examining the text he became aware of a number relationship. This was the first of the discoveries that led to his conversion and uncovered the extensive numeric code within the new testament.

The numeric value of a word is the sum total of all its letters. It was curiosity that first caused Panin to begin toying with the numbers behind the texts. Sequences and patterns began to emerge. These created such a stirring in the heart of the Russian that he dedicated 50 years of his life to painstakingly comb the pages of the Bible

Well, For some months preceding Sunday, November 19, 1899 the New York Sun had been devoting the better part of a page of its Sunday edition to the discussion of the truth of Christianity. On that date it printed a letter from one W.R.L., in which he denounced Christianity, using the old oft-refuted "arguments" and challenged "some champion of orthodoxy to come into the arena of the Sun"

Ivan Panin stepped into the ring, and dropped his opponent with a single massive blow to the skull. That crushing uppercut was this letter.

Sir: -- In to-day's Sun Mr. W.R.L. calls for a "champion of orthodoxy" to "step into the arena of the Sun;' and give him some "facts." Here are some facts:

The first 17 verses of the New Testament contain the genealogy of the Christ. It consists of two main parts: Verses 1-11 cover the period from Abraham, the father of the chosen people, to the Captivity, when they ceased as an independent people. Verses 12-17 cover the period from the Captivity to the promised Deliverer, the Christ.

Let us examine the first part of this genealogy.

Its vocabulary has 49 words, or 7 x 7. This number is itself seven (Feature 1) sevens (Feature 2), and the sum of its factors is 2 sevens (Feature 3). Of these 49 words 28, or 4 sevens, begin with a vowel; and 21, or 3 sevens, begin with a consonant (Feature 4).

Again: these 49 words of the vocabulary have 266 letters, or 7 x 2 x 19; this number is itself 38 sevens (Feature 5), and the sum of its factors is 28, or 4 sevens (Feature 6), while the sum of its figures is 14, or 2 sevens (Feature 7). Of these 266 letters, moreover, 140, or 20 sevens, are vowels, and 126, or 18 sevens, are consonants (Feature 8).

That is to say: Just as the number of words in the vocabulary is a multiple of seven, so is the number of its letters a multiple of seven; just as the sum of the factors of the number of the words is a multiple of seven, so is the sum of the factors of the number of their letters a multiple of seven. And just as the number of words is divided between vowel words and consonant words by sevens, so is their number of letters divided between vowels and consonants by sevens.

Again: Of these 49 words 35, or 5 sevens, occur more than once in the passage; and 14, or 2 sevens, occur but once (Feature 9); seven occur in more than one form, and 42, or 6 sevens, occur in only one form (Feature 10). And among the parts of speech the 49 words are thus divided: 42, or 6 sevens, are nouns, seven are not nouns (Feature 12). Of the nouns 35 or 5 sevens, are Proper names, seven are common nouns (Feature 12). Of the Proper names 28 are male ancestors of the Christ, and seven are not (Feature 13).

Moreover, these 49 words are distributed alphabetically thus: Words under A-E are 21 in number, or 3 sevens; Z-K 14, or 2 sevens; M-X also 14. No other groups of sevens stopping at the end of a letter are made by these 49 words, the groups of sevens stop with these letters and no others. But the letters A, E, Z, K, M, X, are letters 1, 5, 6, 10, 12, 22, of the Greek alphabet, and the sum of these numbers (called their Place Values) is 56, or 8 sevens (Feature 14).

This enumeration of the numeric phenomena of these 11 verses does not begin to be exhaustive, but enough has been shown to make it clear that this part of the genealogy is constructed on an elaborate design of sevens.

Let us not turn to the genealogy as a whole. I will not weary your readers with recounting all the numeric phenomena thereof: pages alone would exhaust them. I will point out only one feature: The New Testament is written in Greek. The Greeks had no separate symbols for expressing numbers, corresponding to our Arabic figures, but used instead the letters of their alphabet: just as the Hebrews, in whose language the Old Testament is written, made use for the same purpose of theirs. Accordingly, the 24 Greek letters stand for the following numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800. Every Greek word is thus a sum in arithmetic obtained by adding the numbers for which its letters stand, or their numeric values. Now the vocabulary to the entire genealogy has 72 words. If we write its numeric value over each of these 72 words, and add them, we get for their sum 42,364, or 6,052 sevens, distributed into the following alphabetical groups only: A-B, have 9,821, or 1,403 sevens: G-D, 1,904, or 272 sevens; 3,703, or 529 sevens; TH-R, 19,264, or 2,752 sevens; A-X 7,672, or 1,096 sevens. But the numeric value of the 10 letters used for making these groups is 931, or 7 x 7 x 19, a multiple not only of seven but of seven sevens.

Let Mr. W.R.L. try to write some 300 words intelligently like this genealogy, and reproduce some numeric phenomena of like designs. If he does it in 6 months, he will indeed do a wonder. Let us assume that Matthew accomplished this feat in one month.

2. The second part of this chapter, verses 18-25, relates the birth of Christ. It consists of 161 words, or 23 sevens; occurring in 105 forms, or 15 sevens, with a vocabulary of 77 words or 11 sevens. Joseph is spoken to here by the angel. Accordingly, of the 77 words the angel uses 28, or 4 sevens; of the 105 forms he uses 35, or 5 sevens; the numeric value of the vocabulary is 52,605, or 7,515 sevens; of the forms, 65,429, or 9,347 sevens.

This enumeration only begins as it were to barely scratch the surface of the numerics of this passage. But what is specially noteworthy here is the fact that the angel's speech has also a scheme of sevens making it a kind of ring within a ring, a wheel within a wheel. If Mr. L. can write a similar passage of 161 words with the same scheme of sevens alone (though there are several others here) in some three years, he would accomplish a still greater wonder. Let us assume Matthew accomplished this feat in only 6 months.

3. The second chapter of Matthew tells of the childhood of the Christ. Its vocabulary has 161 words, or 23 sevens, with 896 letters, or 128 sevens, and 238 forms, or 34 sevens; the numeric value of the vocabulary is 123,529, or 17,647 sevens; of the forms, 166,985, or 23,855 sevens; and so on through pages of enumeration. This chapter has at least four logical divisions, and each division shows alone the same phenomena found in the chapter as a whole. Thus the first six verses have a vocabulary of 56 words, or 8 sevens, etc. There are some speeches here: Herod speaks, the Magi speak, the angel speaks. But so pronounced are the numeric phenomena here, that though there are as it were numerous rings within rings, and wheels within wheels, each is perfect in itself, though forming all the while only part of the rest.

If Mr. L. can write a chapter like this as naturally as Matthew writes, but containing in some 500 words so many intertwined yet harmonious numeric features, in say the rest of his days - whatever his age now, or the one to which he is to attain: if he thus accomplish it at all, it will indeed be marvel of marvels. Let us assume that Matthew accomplished this feat in only 3 years.

4. There is not, however, a single paragraph of the scores in Matthew that is not constructed in exactly the same manner. Only with each additional paragraph the difficulty of constructing it increases not in arithmetical but in geometrical progression. For he contrives to write numeric relations to what goes before and after. Thus in his last chapter he contrives to use just 7 words not used by him before. It would thus be easy to show that Mr. L. would require some centuries to write a book like Matthew's. How long it took Matthew the writer does not know. But how he contrived to do it between the Crucifixion, A.D.30 (and his Gospel could not have been written earlier), and the destruction of Jerusalem, A.D.70 (and the Gospel could not have been written later), let Mr. L. and his like-minded explain.

Anyhow Matthew did it, and we thus have a miracle - an unheard-of literary, mathematical artist, unequaled, hardly even conceivable. This is the first fact for Mr. L. to contemplate.

A second fact is yet more important: In his very first section, the genealogy discussed above, the words found nowhere else in the New Testament, occur 42 times, 7 x 6; and have 126 letters, 7 x 6 x 3, each number a multiple not only of seven, but of 6 sevens, to name only two of the many numeric features of these words. But how did Matthew know, when designing this scheme for these words (whose sole characteristic is that they are found nowhere else in the New Testament) that they would not be found in the other 26 books? that they would not be used by the other 7 New Testament writers? Unless we assume the impossible hypothesis that he had an agreement with them to that effect, he must have had the rest of the New Testament before him when he wrote his book. The Gospel of Matthew, then, was written last.

5. It so happens, however, that the Gospel of Mark shows the very same phenomena. Thus the very passage called so triumphantly in today's Sun a "forgery," the Last Twelve Verses of Mark, presents among some sixty features of sevens the following phenomena: It has 175 words, or 95 sevens; a vocabulary of 98 words, or 2 sevens of sevens with 553 letters, or 79 sevens; 133 forms, or 19 sevens, and so on to the minutest detail.

Mark, then, is another miracle, another unparalleled literary genius. And in the same way in which it was shown that Matthew wrote last it is also shown that Mark, too, wrote last. Thus to take an example from this very passage: It has just one word found nowhere else in the New Testament, 'deadly'. This fact is signaled by no less than seven features of sevens thus: Its numeric value is 581, or 83 sevens, with the sum of its figures 14, or 2 sevens, of which the letters 3, 5, 7, from both the BEGINNING and END of the word have 490, or 7 x 7 x 5 x 2: a multiple of seven sevens, with the sum of its factors 21, or 3 sevens. In the vocabulary it is preceded by 42 words, 7 x 6; in the passage itself by 126 words, or 7 x 6 x 3, both numbers multiples not only of seven, but of 6 sevens. We have thus established before us this third fact for Mr. L. to contemplate: Matthew surely wrote after Mark, and Mark just as surely wrote after Matthew.

6. It happens, however, to be a fourth fact, that Luke presents the same phenomena as Matthew and Mark; and so does John, and James, and Peter, and Jude, and Paul. And we have thus no longer two great unheard-of mathematical literati, but eight of them and each wrote after the other.

7. And not only this: As Luke and Peter wrote each 2 books, John 5, and Paul 14, it can in the same way be shown that each of the 27 New Testament books was written last. In fact, not a page of the over 500 in Westcott and Hort's Greek edition (which the writer has used throughout) but it can be demonstrated thus to have been written last.

The phenomena are there and there is no human way of explaining them. Eight men cannot each write last, 97 books, some 500 pages cannot each be written first. But once assume that one Mind directed the whole, and the problem is solved simply enough; but this is Verbal Inspiration - of every jot and tittle of the New Testament.

There remains only to be added that by precisely the same kind of evidence the Hebrew Old Testament is proved to be equally inspired. Thus the very first verse of Genesis has seven words, 28 letters, or 4 sevens: to name only two out of the dozens of numeric features of this one verse of only seven words. - N.Y. Sun, Nov. 21, 1899 - Corrected.

Pretty neat huh?

And now, much like the stone in the desert we have enough information to look and see that we have both complexity and specificity. Hence, a message.
What was God trying to tell us? well the answer might be in every third letter of the next sentence.

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